Podcasts

  • View from Moscow: China’s Westward March

    China and Russia are solidifying their bilateral relationship as the former looks westward and the latter turns to its east borders. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, Dmitri Trenin discusses the conditions that are leading to stronger China-Russian ties, including China’s growing influence in Eurasia and Russia’s shifting foreign policy orientation. 

    Trenin believes that China and Russia are forming an entente, a relationship that is more than a partnership but less than an alliance. He argues that China has become a larger factor in Russia’s foreign policy out of necessity, given Russian isolation after the Ukraine crisis. At the same time, Trenin insists that Russian leaders realize that China cannot take the place of Russia’s relations with the West, and he notes that they are seeking to avoid allowing China too much influence over Moscow despite Beijing's more favorable geopolitical positioning.

    Dmitri Trenin

    Dmitri Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    China and Russia enjoy an increasingly close relationship that constitutes more than a partnership but falls short of a full alliance.
     
  • 2016 Elections in a Changing Asia-Pacific

    With Tsai Ing-wen taking office in Taipei next week and the U.S. presidential election approaching, new players will be taking the reins in the Asia-Pacific. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, Douglas Paal discusses the future of U.S.-China relations and the broader Asia-Pacific region in the wake of these leadership transitions in the United States and Taiwan.

    Paal said that Asia has not commanded the attention of U.S. voters so far, given the current turmoil in the Middle East and crises in Europe. In a shift from his advice following Obama’s re-election, Paal suggested that the new U.S. president should take time to put his or her administration in place before pursuing any wide-ranging discussions with mainland Chinese leaders. Cross-Strait ties are important for the region at large, yet Paal asserts that the tenor of these relations will depend primarily on China’s actions in the coming months.

    Douglas H. Paal

    Douglas H. Paal is vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He previously served as vice chairman of JPMorgan Chase International (2006-2008) and was an unofficial U.S. representative to Taiwan as director of the American Institute in Taiwan (2002-2006).

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy based at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Haenle’s research focuses on Chinese foreign policy and U.S.-China relations.

    New leadership in Taiwan and the United States has the potential to alter the dynamics of the U.S.-China relationship.
     
  • China’s Relations with a Strategic Europe
    Jan Techau, Paul Haenle April 21, 2016

    For many years, China-EU relations have been driven singularly by mercantilism, but diplomatic engagement between Beijing and Brussels increasingly features a geopolitical component. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, Carnegie-Europe Director Jan Techau discusses the challenges facing the European Union’s integration project as well as the changing nature of China-EU economic and political ties.

    Techau said that EU foreign policy is a big unkept promise of Europe’s integration project, because disparate interests and policies among EU member states has made it difficult for Europe to project a singular, cohesive foreign-policy agenda. According to Techau, this dynamic is relevant to Europe’s debate about whether to grant market economy status to China, an issue European countries disagree on. China’s new Belt and Road initiative demonstrates that while economics and the search for new markets still bring Brussels and Beijing together, China’s growing influence in Europe, compared to that of the United States, poses a challenge for Brussels and could pull China and the EU apart.

    Jan Techau

    Jan Techau is the director of Carnegie Europe, the European center of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Techau works on EU integration and foreign policy, transatlantic affairs, and German foreign and security policy.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    Projecting a cohesive foreign policy is a key challenge facing the European Union, and its dealings with China are no exception.
     
  • U.S.-China Relations and the South China Sea
    J. Stapleton Roy, Paul Haenle March 27, 2016

    China’s efforts to secure its claims in the Paracel Islands have raised fresh questions about the direction of U.S.-China relations. To many, recurring tensions between the two countries reflect a growing sense of strategic rivalry that must be carefully managed. In this podcast, former U.S. ambassador to China J. Stapleton Roy and Paul Haenle discuss the situation in the South China Sea and the broader implications for U.S.-China relations.

    Ambassador Roy noted that China’s policy on the South China Sea has been ambiguous on key issues, while also pointing out that China treats specific island chains differently. He stated that U.S. policymakers and observers therefore must be analytically nuanced about how to prudently wield the tools of diplomacy to address the concerns of both countries. Ambassador Roy advised that the United States and China would do well to agree on a code of conduct for the region, and he maintained that these disputes can be effectively settled.

    J. Stapleton Roy

    J. Stapleton Roy is founding director emeritus of the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. He previously served as the U.S. ambassador to Singapore, China, and Indonesia.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    Disputes between China and U.S. allies over the South China can be settled diplomatically, but this will require a nuanced understanding of all parties’ concerns.
     
  • China-EU Trade and Economic Relations
    Joerg Wuttke, Paul Haenle February 9, 2016

    China and the European Union enjoy increasingly strong economic and commercial ties, solidified by a landmark year in 2015. Xi Jinping met with top leaders from the UK, France, and Germany to expand economic cooperation. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, EU Chamber of Commerce President Joerg Wuttke discusses what he thinks the EU can expect in the coming years regarding its economic presence in China.

    Wuttke notes that the main story in EU-China relations in 2015 was not simply an increase in trade but rather a complete shift in investment flows, as China invested $22 billion in the European Union. He expects this level of Chinese investment into Europe to continue, but he reasons that European investment in China may slow due to lower growth rates and other constraints. Wuttke also comments on emerging international initiatives that China has put forward, such as the Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank and the Belt and Road.

    Joerg Wuttke

    Joerg Wuttke is the president of the European Union Chamber of Commerce. He has been vice president and chief representative of BASF China since 1997.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    2015 has seen a sizable increase in China’s investment in the European Union, as well as increasingly strong commercial and economic ties.
     
  • Is China’s Belt and Road a Strategy?
    Paul Haenle, Xie Tao January 19, 2016

    In the past year, the Belt and Road initiative has been a highly popular topic for Chinese analysts and journalists, who have described China’s drive to finance infrastructure projects in neighboring countries as a national or grand strategy. In this podcast, host Paul Haenle and Xie Tao discuss the economic and geopolitical motivations behind this initiative and the nuanced ways that the Chinese government and analysts have described it.

    Xie Tao argues that Chinese leaders have defined these efforts as an initiative to frame it as a call for action for China to provide public goods to other countries. He notes that China’s policymaking process has lacked transparency, leaving some uncertainty about China’s intentions. Haenle points out that it is important for China’s diplomats to communicate closely with the rest of the international community about details surrounding the initiative. If China is not forthcoming and transparent about its efforts, Haenle argues, people will assume that their own assumptions about it are true. 

    Xie Tao

    Xie Tao is a professor of political science at Beijing Foreign Studies University. He holds a PhD in political science from Northwestern University and is the author of U.S.-China Relations: China Policy on Capitol Hill and co-author of Living with the Dragon: How the American Public Views the Rise of China.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    Chinese leaders have framed the Belt and Road initiative as a way for China to provide public goods to other countries, although a lack of transparency has led some to question China’s motives.
     
  • The 2016 Taiwan Elections and Cross-Strait Relations
    Shelley Rigger, Paul Haenle January 2, 2016

    The historic visit between Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou in November 2015 cemented the legacies of both leaders, but a projected Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) victory in Taiwan’s January 16, 2016 elections could introduce new challenges and strains into cross-Strait relations. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, recorded during her visit to Beijing as Carnegie-Tsinghua’s fifteenth Distinguished Speaker, Taiwan expert Shelley Rigger assesses the upcoming elections in Taiwan, the motivations behind the Xi-Ma meeting, changes in the DPP since 2000, and reasons for optimism about the future of cross-Strait ties.

    Rigger asserted that the Xi-Ma meeting was meant to highlight the legacy of cooperation built by the two sides over the past several years. She said that Xi’s openness to this meeting could provide an opportunity for officials and scholars to “think outside the box” on how to promote good ties in the future. In addition, Rigger explained that the DPP and its presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen want to “see cross-Strait relations sustained in a stable fashion.” Although there will certainly be challenges, these are all reasons that the international community can remain somewhat optimistic about cross-Strait relations in the coming years.​

    Click here for a full transcript

    Shelley Rigger 

    Shelley Rigger is the Brown Professor of East Asian Politics, chair of Chinese Studies, and assistant dean for educational policy at Davidson College​.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    The historic visit between Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou cemented the legacies of both leaders, but a DPP victory in Taiwan’s elections could introduce new challenges into cross-Strait relations.
     
  • China-India Nuclear Relations
    Chintamani Mahapatra, Tong Zhao December 22, 2015

    Nuclear balance is a pillar of security in the Indo-Pacific region. China has continued to improve its second-strike nuclear deterrent capabilities. Meanwhile, India has gained greater access to foreign nuclear materials and technology to build a more advanced nuclear weapons program. These parallel developments have added new complexities to security interactions between Beijing and New Delhi that deserve careful attention from policymakers and other observers alike.

    In this podcast, Tong Zhao and Chintamani Mahapatra examined how these new realities present both challenges and opportunities for policymakers as they manage the nuclear relationship between China and India. The two discussed whether China and India can cooperate on nuclear energy policy and how India’s ongoing efforts to modernize its nuclear arsenal has affected bilateral nuclear stability. They also assessed implications of India’s acceptance into the Nuclear Suppliers Group for regional nuclear order and Pakistan’s nuclear program.

    Chintamani Mahapatra

    Chintamani Mahapatra is the chairman of the Canada, U.S., and Latin American Studies Department at the School of International Studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University.

    Tong Zhao

    Tong Zhao is an associate at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy who specializes in nuclear and strategic security issues.

    China’s efforts to strengthen its second-strike deterrence and India’s greater access to nuclear technology must be managed carefully to maintain a stable security environment.
     
  • Xi Jinping’s State Visit to the United States
    Paul Haenle, Evan Medeiros September 20, 2015

    This week, Chinese President Xi Jinping embarks on his first state visit to the United States at a complicated moment in the bilateral relationship. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, former senior director for Asian affairs on the U.S. National Security Council Evan Medeiros explains why he has modest expectations for Xi’s visit and why he believes that the most important aspect of the summit will be the private, strategic discussions between the two leaders.

    Medeiros observes that frictions are not a new feature of the U.S.-China relationship, which has long been a mix of cooperation and competition. He says that the core challenge for U.S. policymakers is to balance these two elements by encouraging China to cooperate more while managing areas of competition so that they do not define the relationship. Medeiros notes that the relationship is highly resilient, due to the tireless efforts of U.S. and Chinese policymakers who have deepened communication channels while navigating difficult issues over the years. This strong track record provides what Medeiros believes is a solid foundation for a constructive relationship for the rest of the Obama administration.

    Evan Medeiros

    Evan Medeiros was special assistant to the president and senior director for Asian Affairs at the White House’s National Security Council staff of President Barack Obama from July 2013 to June 2015. Prior to that, he served as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs and was a senior political scientist at the RAND Corporation. 

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    The U.S.-China relationship has long been a mix of cooperation and competition. The core challenge for policymakers is to balance these two elements by encouraging the first and managing the second.
     
  • What is Going on with China’s Economy?
    Yukon Huang, Paul Haenle August 19, 2015

    The Shanghai composite stock index has lost more than a quarter of its value since early June, after more than doubled in the preceding year. Government intervention meant to prop up prices has so far failed to stabilize stocks or restore public confidence. In the second part of a three-part series, Paul Haenle and Carnegie’s Yukon Huang discuss the roles that the state and market forces play in China’s transitioning economy, particularly with regard to the country’s equity market.

    Yukon Huang explains that although market forces are indeed freeing up the prices of goods, interest rates, and capital flows in China, these reforms do not imply that the state will relinquish its ownership over key raw material supplies or strategically important state enterprises. Huang maintains that China’s leaders remain committed to deepening and strengthening the country’s capital market so as to achieve their goals of internationalizing the renminbi and strengthening Chinese influence on the international financial system. 

    Yukon Huang

    Yukon Huang is a senior associate in the Carnegie Asia Program. His research focuses on China’s economic development and its impact on Asia and the global economy.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    China’s leaders remain committed to strengthening the country’s capital market so as to internationalize the renminbi and enhance Chinese influence on the international financial system.
     
  • What Caused the Chinese Stock Market Crash?
    Yukon Huang, Paul Haenle August 3, 2015

    The Shanghai composite stock index has lost more than a quarter of its value since early June, after more than doubled in the preceding year. Government intervention meant to prop up prices has so far failed to stabilize stocks or restore public confidence. In the first part of a three-part series, Paul Haenle and Carnegie’s Yukon Huang discuss the causes of the crash, its political and economic consequences, and how China’s stock market differs from those of other countries.

    Huang explained that the growth in China’s stock market over the past year was encouraged by government policies rather than underlying economic conditions. Regulators and leaders who might ordinarily have urged caution to manage risk instead directed more investment into the equity market so as to internationalize the renminbi and to help manage China’s debt problem. Huang explained that although these objectives are sensible, their implementation was not carefully considered. He argued that the stock market crash is unlikely to prompt wider economic contagion, because only seven percent of Chinese households own stock. Still, Huang argued that the confidence and credibility of the top Chinese leadership has been undermined.

    Yukon Huang

    Yukon Huang is a senior associate in the Carnegie Asia Program. His research focuses on China’s economic development and its impact on Asia and the global economy.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    While the recent stock market crash seems unlikely to prompt wider economic fallout, it has undermined the confidence and credibility of Chinese leaders.
     
  • How China’s Rise Affects Its Neighbors (Part 2)
    Tong Zhao, John Garver July 20, 2015

    China’s foreign policy has shifted in recent years from a low-profile approach to a more proactive one. This change is evident in China’s growing diplomatic, economic, and military influence. John Garver and Tong Zhao discuss China’s growing role in global affairs and how the United States and countries in the Asia-Pacific view this geopolitical shift.

    In the second half of this two-part podcast, Garver provides a historical overview of U.S. strategic objectives in the Pacific and highlights how they are shaping U.S.-China relations today. He also discusses the implications of Xi Jinping’s proposal of mutual respect for core interests for U.S.-China diplomatic engagement in the future.

    John Garver

    John Garver is a professor of international affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Sam Nunn School of International Affairs. He specializes in and has written extensively on Asian international relations and China’s foreign relations.

    Tong Zhao

    Tong Zhao is an associate in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. His research focuses on strategic security issues, including nuclear arms control, nonproliferation, missile defense, strategic stability, and China’s security and foreign policy.

    Long-standing U.S. strategic objectives in the Pacific and Xi Jinping’s proposal of mutual respect for core interests shape current U.S.-China relations.
     
  • How China’s Rise Affects Its Neighbors (Part 1)
    Tong Zhao, John Garver July 6, 2015

    China’s foreign policy has shifted in recent years from a low-profile approach to a more proactive one. This change is evident in China’s growing diplomatic, economic, and military influence. John Garver and Tong Zhao discuss China’s growing role in global affairs and how the United States and countries in the Asia-Pacific perceive this geopolitical shift.

    In the first half of this two-part podcast, Garver focuses on China’s relations with neighboring countries, especially on how China can manage its complicated territorial disputes with Japan and the Philippines. Garver also offers his thoughts on whether China’s key neighbors and the United States will accept China’s growing power or jointly attempt to hedge against its rise.

    John Garver

    John Garver is a professor of international affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Sam Nunn School of International Affairs. He specializes in and has written extensively on Asian international relations and China’s foreign relations.

    Tong Zhao

    Tong Zhao is an associate in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. His research focuses on strategic security issues, including nuclear arms control, nonproliferation, missile defense, strategic stability, and China’s security and foreign policy.

    China’s growing economic, political, and military power is redefining the country’s international role and changing its relationships with neighboring Asian countries and the United States.
     
  • Petcoke and China’s Efforts to Combat Air Pollution
    Paul Haenle, Wang Tao June 23, 2015

    Petroleum coke, or petcoke, is a byproduct of the petroleum refining process that produces more greenhouse gas emissions than coal or natural gas. Paul Haenle and Wang Tao discussed how the substance, which is used to generate power and manufacture aluminum, is an overlooked complication to China’s efforts to combat climate change.

    Wang pointed out that how the rising price of coal has led an increasing number of Chinese firms to turn to petcoke as an inexpensive alternative fuel, as they seek to manage costs. Noting that few Chinese policymakers are aware of petcoke’s environmental impact, Wang suggested that the Chinese government should monitor and measure petcoke use more rigorously, in concert with potential policy responses such as carbon taxes or import tariffs, so as to minimize petcoke’s contributions to air pollution in China.

    Wang Tao

    Wang Tao is a resident scholar in the Energy and Climate Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. His research focuses on China’s climate and energy policy, with particular attention to unconventional oil and natural gas, transportation, electric vehicles, and international climate negotiations.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    China must improve its monitoring of petcoke, an alternative fuel source, in order to successfully address the country’s air pollution challenges.
     
  • China-Russia Relations After Ukraine

    Following the crisis in Ukraine last year and subsequent Western sanctions against Moscow, China and Russia have become more politically aligned. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, Carnegie Moscow director Dmitri Trenin explained how Chinese and Russian leaders hold a similar vision of the world and how closer China-Russia relations will affect the international system.

    Trenin argued that Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin are united largely by a shared desire for a more multipolar world in which non-Western countries hold more sway. He also asserted that China and Russia can identify many new areas of common interest to enhance cooperation, such as expanding infrastructure in Central Asia, fostering mutual economic development, and cultivating a community of like-minded, non-Western countries to shape the future of the international order.

    Dmitri Trenin

    Dmitri Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    A shared commitment to building a multipolar international order in which emerging countries have greater influence is drawing Chinese and Russian leaders closer together.
     
  • U.S. Nuclear Posture and Regional Security Challenges
    Tong Zhao, Matthew Kroenig May 17, 2015

    Policy discussions about the appropriate role of nuclear weapons in national defense strategies are becoming all the more vital in light of global security developments, such as ongoing nuclear talks between Iran and its negotiating partners and the evolving nuclear dimension of NATO’s security posture toward Russia. In this podcast, Tong Zhao and Matthew Kroenig discuss U.S. policy options in the event that nuclear negotiations with Iran fall through and the future outlook of NATO nuclear posture in Europe.

    Kroenig maintained his position that the April 2015 framework agreement with Iran is a poor outcome for Washington because it would allow Iran to retain its enrichment capacity and leaves the door open to future proliferation by Iran and other regional actors. He asserted that the United States should a wide range of policy options to ensure that Iran does not acquire nuclear capabilities, including military action. Zhao and Kroenig also discussed the potential consequences of the United States adopting a more assertive nuclear posture vis-à-vis Russia and the precedent that such a policy shift could introduce to the Asia-Pacific security landscape.

    Matthew Kroenig

    Matthew Kroenig is an associate professor and international relations field chair in the Department of Government and School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and a senior fellow in the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security at The Atlantic Council.

    Tong Zhao

    Tong Zhao is an associate in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. His research focuses on strategic security issues, including nuclear arms control, nonproliferation, missile defense, strategic stability, and China’s security and foreign policy.

    Washington must be prepared to act decisively if nuclear talks with Iran fail, while the potential that NATO may adopt a more flexible nuclear posture toward Russia has broad security implications.
     
  • Russia’s Pivot to Asia

    Since Russia annexed Crimea in March 2014, President Vladimir Putin has accelerated the country’s pivot to Asia so as to reduce its dependence on Europe. In this podcast with Paul Haenle, Carnegie Moscow’s Alexander Gabuev noted that Russia’s strategy centers on China, the only nonaligned regional power that can meet Russia’s needs for technology, capital, and markets.

    Gabuev asserted that neither Russian nor Chinese audiences have been overly receptive to Putin’s Asian pivot, aside from Chinese President Xi Jinping. For elites in Moscow, Russia’s relationship with Asia has been used primarily as a bargaining chip with the West, Gabuev said. Since Western sanctions took effect, however, Russia has had no choice but to look for other partnerships. Gabuev asserted that Beijing has taken advantage of Moscow’s limited options, but that China remains wary of Russia’s faltering economy. 

    Alexander Gabuev

    Alexander Gabuev is a senior associate and the chair of the Asia-Pacific Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center. His research is focused on Russia’s policy toward East and Southeast Asia, China’s relations with its neighbors in Central Asia, and political and ideological trends in China.  

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    China has the capacity to fulfill Russian needs for technology, capital, and markets, but Beijing remains wary of Russia’s faltering economy.
     
  • The Impact of China’s Price Cut on Natural Gas
    Dong Xiucheng, Wang Tao May 4, 2015

    In early 2015, China’s National Development and Reform Commission announced a major cut in natural gas prices starting in April. In this inaugural Chinese-language podcast, Carnegie–Tsinghua's Wang Tao and Dong Xiucheng discussed the reasons for, and the impact of, the price cut in relation to China's energy security.

    Dong explained that the cut in the price of China’s natural gas is the direct result of lower crude oil prices. He maintained that this price cut will have a negative impact on natural gas producers and importers, while producing benefits for fertilizer makers and other chemical industries. Suggesting that future price changes should be more frequent and market-oriented, Dong asserted that China should diversify its energy resources so as to minimize the effects of unpredictable market fluctuations.

    This podcast was recorded in Chinese.

    Wang Tao

    Wang Tao is a resident scholar in the Energy and Climate Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. His research interests include unconventional oil and natural gas as well as China’s energy policy.

    Dong Xiucheng

    Dong Xiucheng is the director of the Oil and Gas Development Research Center at the China University of Petroleum. He also serves as a strategic and policy consultant for the Chinese government and major petroleum corporations.

    China’s price cut on natural gas reflects the drop in oil prices, as the country’s energy sector continues to go through transition.
     
  • Debunking More Myths About China’s Economy
    Yukon Huang, Paul Haenle April 27, 2015

    As China’s economy has expanded rapidly over the past three decades, the impact of its performance on global markets has also grown. In the second half of this podcast, Paul Haenle and Carnegie’s Yukon Huang examined myths about the relationship between China’s trade surpluses and U.S. trade deficits as well as the challenges and opportunities facing China’s efforts to promote urbanization.

    Huang refuted the commonly-held assumption that U.S. trade deficits are caused by China’s trade surpluses by pointing out that U.S. trade deficits emerged years before China’s surpluses did. He also argued that China’s sprawling cities are smaller and less densely populated than other large urban centers elsewhere in the world. Huang concluded that differing political systems, cultures, and value systems help explain why views on China’s economy diverge so greatly.

    Yukon Huang

    Yukon Huang is a senior associate in the Carnegie Asia Program. His research focuses on China’s economic development and its impact on Asia and the global economy.

    Paul Haenle

    Paul Haenle is the director of the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. Prior to joining Carnegie, he served from June 2007 to June 2009 as the director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolian Affairs on the National Security Council staffs of former president George W. Bush and President Barack Obama.

    China’s economy is not as imbalanced as conventional wisdom would suggest, and urbanization remains a core feature of the country’s development policy.
     
  • The Nuclear Framework Agreement and China-Iran Relations
    Tong Zhao, Ariane Tabatabai April 13, 2015

    Iran and its P5+1 negotiating partners reached a groundbreaking framework agreement on Tehran’s nuclear program in early April. In this podcast, Carnegie’s Tong Zhao and Ariane Tabatabai discussed the agreement, follow-up talks on technical details, and China’s relations with Iran.

    Tabatabai asserted that changes in Iran’s domestic political landscape were an important element of Tehran’s negotiating stance, although the economic benefits of ending sanctions also played a key role. She maintained that rolling back sanctions not only would be economically advantageous for Iran, but also could enhance the country’s commercial and diplomatic engagement with China. She suggested that China must foster trust with the Iranian public in order to deepen cooperation on trade and infrastructure development.

    Ariane Tabatabai

    Ariane Tabatabai is a visiting assistant professor in the Security Studies Program at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. She is also an associate in the Belfer Center’s International Security Program and the Project on Managing the Atom at Harvard University.

    Tong Zhao

    Tong Zhao is an associate in Carnegie’s Nuclear Policy Program based at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy. His research focuses on strategic security issues, including nuclear arms control, nonproliferation, missile defense, strategic stability, and China’s security and foreign policy.

    The framework agreement between Iran and its P5+1 negotiating partners could serve as a foundation for deepening economic and diplomatic cooperation between Tehran and Beijing.
     

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